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Family films elephants crossing road, takes a closer look at the baby and burst out laughing

Sneezing can be annoying as hell— but also disturbingly satisfying.

According to Scientific American, sneezing is a biological response caused by the nose’s epithelium lining being irritated. Generally, the sneezing process begins when inflammatory cells (like eosinophils and mast cells) release chemicals (such as histamines and leukotrienes) after being physically irritated by irritants. These can include anything from smoke and pollution to perfume and cold air

These histamines and leukotrienes ultimately lead to fluid leakage which stimulates nerve endings and makes your nose feel itchy. The itching sensation then activates a reflex in the brain, and BAM— an oh-so-relieving sneeze.

Although sneezing isn’t the prettiest activity for most of us— when this baby elephant does it, it is downright ADORABLE.

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Source: YouTube Screenshot

In the 30-second clip which was uploaded to YouTube in February of 2009, we see a group of elephants crossing a dirt path.

Very quickly, however, the little one takes note of the people filming, turning directly their way.

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Source: YouTube Screenshot

“Awe!” you can hear the people behind the camera saying over the flash of photos. “Hello, baby!”

By the 7-second mark, however, the tiny elephant lets out a whopping sneeze— scaring itself and completely cracking up his audience.

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Source: YouTube Screenshot

The little elephant immediately runs to its mother, seeking protection from the “scary” sneeze, the ele-family stopping to soothe the little guy before carrying on their merry way.

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Source: YouTube Screenshot

You can hear a male in the background saying, “Please tell me someone got that on video,” before a woman answers, “I did, I did!”

In a National Geographic article about animal sneezes, John Lenhardt, of the National Elephant Center, an elephant sanctuary in Florida, explains, “Indeed, elephants sneeze through their trunks as it is still their nose.”

He continues, “It can be very loud, as you might imagine, and is usually accompanied by significant spray also. It is normal, but just elephant-sized.”

Regardless of the science behind it, I have just developed a newfound love of elephant sneezes— and if Twitter is any indication, I am definitely not the only one!

Although it’s an older video, it has once again been making its rounds, hitting an impressive 18.2 million views on YouTube.

Check it out for yourself below!

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

Source: kikicat25

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